Minneapolis Sculpture Garden

Minneapolis Sculpture Garden.jpg

Minneapolis is considered as the largest city and with the most number of population in the entire state of Minnesota. Minneapolis became a home to 410,939 people almost 60% of Minnesota’s people lives in Minneapolis. With such a huge number of household, cleaning services companies became a part of the lives of the people living in Minneapolis. Helping each and every family achieve and maintain the spotless clean state of their homes because it is important for every household to have a well maintained organized home. That is why people in Minneapolis can enjoy their beautiful attractions because maid cleaning services that are just a call away and can avail of the service at a very affordable price. By simply hiring a professional cleaner families in Minneapolis can own their free time. They can spend it to more important matters than cleaning or even explore the beautiful places of Minneapolis together with their family. So, if you live in Minneapolis what are you waiting for? Book a maid service and enjoy a day with your family. As your next tour destination with your family and friends you can surely enjoy fun activities while learning about art at the same time. There are lots of family destinations around Minneapolis one of those and you shouldn’t miss is the:

Sculpture Garden

Minneapolis Sculpture Garden was reopened on June 10, 2017, after spending $33 million dollars for the renovation, it is finally open for the public with free admission. The 11-acre park consists of 42 different sculptures that have been there for about 30 years and 18 new sculptures that were added during the renovation. The park is part of the Walker Art Center campus that is located at 725 Vineland Place, Minneapolis, MN 55403 and is opened daily from 6:00 AM to 12:00 MN. Minneapolis Sculpture Garden has now better views because it has a new layout that incorporates more breathing room and sunlight and also, regardless of where you are standing, you will be able to see all the grounds. You can also enjoy taking pictures or selfies all over the place.

In this article, let us name some of the sculptures that we will be able to see in Minneapolis Sculpture Garden and cite some of their history and origin.

Spoonbridge and Cherry

The Iconic Spoonbridge and Cherry is an artwork collaboration of the husband and wife Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen that was built between 1985 to 1988. It was the first work that was ever displayed in the park when it opened in 1988.

Gog & Magog (Ampersand)

This 14-feet granite sculpture was made by Martin Puryear from 1987 to 1988 and became the gateway to the park. He shaped each huge granite blocks like a cone by using a large lathe which is similar to a giant pencil sharpener. He turns it upside down as he said “standing symmetry on its head,” he challenged the formal structure of the garden's original layout.

Untitled (gate)

This was created by Monika Sosnowska in 2014, this piece of art was made up of paint and steel. Sosnowska's inspiration with this creation Untitled (gate) was a metal barricade that she saw in Warsaw used to protect a glass window in front of a local store. She used heavy machinery to crush, twist, flatten, and otherwise change the metal to create this masterpiece.

X

Created by Liz Larner in 2013, this creation is made out of mirror-polished stainless steel that is characterized by bright colors or curving lines. Her abstract sculptures appear as if they were drawings that became three-dimensional. Liz Larner investigates ways that simple geometric forms might change through the surrounding environment, the viewer’s position, and movement. When viewed from any angle, this mirror-polished artwork constantly changes its image.

Sitzwuste

The brightly painted sculptures made up of aluminum and lacquer was a masterpiece of Franz West. The name Sitzwuste was a combination of German words sitz which means "seat", wulst meaning "bulge" and wurst which means "sausage". The sculptures were made for seating that invites the people to rest and take in the view. West made sculptural works beginning in the early 1970's exploring the idea that art should be scaled for human beings, who by nature want to touch things.

Hare on Bell on Portland Stone Piers

Created by Barry Flanagan in 1983, this sculpture is made up of bronze and limestone. It is a symbol of immortality in Chinese mythology and it represents life in the art of ancient Egypt. The sculpture is an elongated rabbit that was caught in an energetic leap.

Hahn/Cock

A creation of Katharina Fritsch between 2013 and 2017, this giant blue rooster is made out of fiberglass, polyester resin, stainless steel, and paint, artist-designed painted steel pedestal. It is nearly 25 feet in height above the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. It symbolizes pride, power, and courage or posturing and macho prowess. Its title plays double meaning in someone's mind which was Fritsch's intention admitting that she enjoys “games with language”.

LOVE

LOVE, with its tilted “O,” is now considered as Robert Indiana's most iconic image. She loves to create sculptures and paintings that focus and featured powerful words. This creation is made up of Cor-Ten steel and has been made in many variations.

Woodrow

A creation of Deborah Butterfield in 1988, this sculpture is made of bronze and is inspired by the horses on her ranch. Her works are often made out of scrap metal, like wood or straw. Butterfield collected sticks and bark, painstakingly cast each piece in bronze, then reassembled and welded them together to form the horse’s body to create the sculpture. The meticulous result is known as trompe l’oeil, or “trick of the eye” gives its convincing wood like appearance.

Rapture

Created in 2001 by Kiki Smith, this sculpture is made of bronze. the artist's inspiration came from fairy tales, myths, and folk narratives. She also explores themes of metamorphosis, life and death, the cosmos, and nature. Rapture, in which a woman appears to emerge from a slain wolf, is in part her re-imagined ending to the tale of Little Red Riding Hood.

 

Gladys Perez